Joseph Lieberman & Dick Gephardt on the Issues
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These two men have been reported to still be in the race, but also reported to be falling behind in the Democratic Primaries. Maybe they can move up in the race. Stranger things have happened. Stay tuned to this site for updates.
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Joseph Lieberman on the Issues
Senator Joseph Lieberman (Democrat, Connecticut) Born in Stamford, Connecticut on February 24, 1942 and attended public schools there. He received his bachelor's degree from Yale College in 1964 and his law degree from Yale Law School in 1967. Lieberman was elected to the Connecticut State Senate in 1970 and served there for 10 years, including the last 6 as Majority Leader. From 1982 to 1988, he served as Connecticut's 21st Attorney General. He is the author of four books. In the U.S. Senate, Lieberman became the Ranking Democratic Member of the Governmental Affairs Committee in January 1999. He is a member of the powerful Armed Services Committee, the Environment and Public Works Committee, and the Small Business Committee. Since 1995, he has been Chairman of the Democratic Leadership Council. Lieberman lives in New Haven with his wife Hadassah. They are the parents of four children: Matthew, Rebecca, Ethan and Hana.


Taxes & Spending:
Based on ratings from taxpayer advocacy groups such as National Taxpayers Union and Americans for Tax Reform, this candidate shares very little of their views. According to the Concord Coalition, he is agrees with almost half their positions on the balanced budget issue.
Address to the Economic Club of Detroit on May 20, 2002 "The Need to Lead: The Case for a New Economic Growth Strategy". Lieberman said, "It's about creating and protecting jobs for millions of Americans..."

Social Services Funding:
He supports the President's faith-based initiatives.

Welfare: The Children's Defense Fund, an organization concerned how poverty and welfare cuts effect children and families, recently gave him a score of 91%. BIPAC, the Business-Industry Political Action Committee gave him a score of 0%.

Security & Terrorism:
Voted "yes" on HR 3162, Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism (USA PATRIOT) Act of 2001.
He helped win Congressional approval for the creation of a 10-member, non-partisan citizens commission that will have subpoena power to investigate a broad range of issues such as immigration policy, aviation security, intelligence gaps, and the diplomatic record.
"Properly constituted, military tribunals can provide now what they provided in the past: a fair, impartial means of trying and, if appropriate, punishing those who violate the laws of war."
Voted "yes" on the "Visa Entry Reform Act of 2001", a bill to strengthen counter-terrorism efforts by imposing restrictions on student visas and among other things, it creates a centralized 'lookout' database.

Foreign Affairs:
Lieberman was the lead Senate sponsor of a bipartisan resolution authorizing the President to use military force to eliminate the threat posed by Iraq's weapons of mass destruction.
Said he backs President Bush's "call to action" at the United Nations against the threat represented by Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein. Said a solution to the Mideast conflict must include a "strong and peaceful" Palestinian state.

Education:
Condemned the Bush Administration's "failure to provide sufficient funding for the No Child Left Behind Act, the historic K-12 education reform bill signed into law last year."
Voted "yes" on an amendment that would increase the tax deduction for college tuition costs from ,000 to ,000 and increase the tax credit on student loan interest from to $1,000.
Announced on April 15, 2002 his intention to develop and introduce a major reform bill that will help make the precious promise of high quality higher education a reality for more Americans. It will focus on three areas: resources--so that we bring college within the reach of all American families, regardless of income; readiness--so that students are prepared for college when they graduate high school; and results--so that students, especially low-income students, graduate within six years and get into high-wage jobs.

Healthcare:
According to his senate website, Lieberman "works to expand quality and affordable healthcare to all Americans and safeguard Medicare and Social Security for future generations."
Voted "no" on banning human cloning. (Bill S. 1601 on Feb 11, 1998)

Social Security:
"Senator Joseph I. Lieberman who once supported Social Security Personal Retirement Accounts now says that Gov. George W. Bush's plan to do so would "savage" Social Security by taking $1 trillion out of the nest egg that belongs to every worker in America." Voted "no" on HR 1259: Social Security and Medicare Safe Deposit Box Act of 1999.

Illicit Drugs:
Voted "yes" on (S 625 /1999) to increase penalties on certain drug-related crimes. The amendment would specifically target the manufacturing or trafficking of amphetamines and methamphetamines and possession of powder cocaine. It would also set stronger penalties for dealing drugs to minors or near a school.

Ex-felons' Voting Rights:
Voted "yes" on this issue.

Gun Policy:
He received an "F" from the NRA, and 100% from The Coalition to Stop Gun Violence

Abortion Policy:
He received 100% score from Planned Parenthood and a zero from the National Right to Life Committee.

Environmental Policy:
He received a 100% score from the League of Conservation Voters.
"This (Bush) administration is conducting a campaign to eliminate numerous environmental, health and safety protections," Lieberman said. "We have seen - in the face of several environmental rules the administration tried to roll back two years ago - a disregard for the scientific record, the value of public participation in rule-making, and for established regulatory procedure."

Minority Issues:
He received a 91% score from the NAACP.

Civil Liberties:
He received a 25% score from The American Civil Liberties Union.

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Dick Gephardt on the Issues
Representative Richard Gephardt, Democrat Missouri Born in 1941 in the same South St. Louis neighborhood he represents today, Missouri's 3rd district. Graduated from Northwestern University and the University of Michigan Law School. Elected to represent Missouri's Third Congressional District in 1976. In 1984, Gephardt was elected Chairman of the House Democratic Caucus, the fourth-ranking leadership position in the House. In 1989, he was elected by his colleagues in the House to serve as their Majority Leader. Resigned as Majority Leader after the 2002 election. He has been married to Jane Byrnes Gephardt for more than three decades. They have three children: Matt, Chrissy and Katie.


Taxes & Spending:
Based on ratings from taxpayer advocacy groups such as National Taxpayers Union and Americans for Tax Reform, this candidate shares very few of their views. According to the Concord Coalition, he is agrees with slightly less than a quarter of their positions on balanced budget issue. On his site he calls for "a fair reshaping of estate taxes so no family owned small business is sold just to pay Uncle Sam."

Social Services Funding:
Voted "no" on HR 7 Community Solutions Act of 2001. Bill would allow religious organizations to compete equally with other non-governmental groups for federal funds to provide social service, and provide .3 billion in tax breaks for charitable giving over 10 years. Gephardt said he felt the bill represented a missed opportunity to help faith-based organizations, because they often tend to the most underprivileged in our society and are vital and irreplaceable to every community. However, he felt that the consequences of allowing groups to pre-empt civil rights protections, would make it easier for these groups to ignore fundamental principles of liberty and equality.

Welfare:
The Children's Defense Fund, an organization concerned how poverty and welfare cuts effect children and families, recently gave him a score of 82%. BIPAC, the Business-Industry Political Action Committee gave him a score of 6%.

Security & Terrorism:
Voted "yes" on HR 3162, Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism (USA PATRIOT) Act of 2001.
Voted "yes" on the "Visa Entry Reform Act of 2001", a bill to strengthen counter-terrorism efforts by imposing restrictions on student visas and among other things, it creates a centralized 'lookout' database.

Foreign Affairs:
Voted "yes" on H.J.RES.114, Authorization for the Use of Military Force Against Iraq.
Suggested President Bush delay his proposal for creation of a Palestinian state in the midst of "barbaric suicide attacks against Israelis." "It is fine to set out the dream and the goal and to hope that will give people on the Palestinian side some hope," Gephardt said, as Bush worked on the proposal. "But it isn't going to change anything, in my view."

Education:
"Vouchers drain funds from failing schools at the very moment when schools need these resources the most ... We must not allow 'reform' to erode the federal responsibility to support national priorities like helping disadvantaged students and putting a quality teacher in every classroom."
"We want to work together to recruit high- quality teachers and invest more in our schools while demanding more from them. We want to say to every student who wants to go to college and every worker who wants to update their skills the first ,000 of your education should be tax deductible." - Democratic response to the State of the Union speech Jan 29, 2002
"The government needs to do more to help schools. We've agreed to fund 100,000 new teachers in grades one through three. The Clinton administration is trying to use federal dollars to help districts pay the costs on school construction bonds. We must fully fund Head Start and make it available to younger children. I believe more teachers, more classrooms, and reaching out to prepare students to learn are an appropriate way for the federal government to help schools cope." - An Even Better Place, by Dick Gephardt, p.157-58 Jul 2, 1999
Voted "yes" on requiring states to test students. No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (Bill HR 1 ; vote number 2001-145 on May 23, 2001) Vote to pass a bill that would authorize .8 billion in education funding, a 29 percent increase from fiscal 2001. The bill would require states to test students to track progress.
We want to say to every student who wants to go to college and every worker who wants to update their skills the first ,000 of your education should be tax deductible. - Democratic response to the State of the Union speech Jan 29, 2002

Healthcare:
Providence Journal Bulletin reported om Jan 28, 2003 that Gephardt said in an interview that within a month or so he would propose a universal health-insurance plan that would cover the 42 million uninsured Americans.
Voted "no" on HR 2505 Human Cloning Prohibition Act of 2001. Bill would prohibit human cloning for either medical research or reproductive purposes.

Social Security:
"We need to remember that stock values go down as well as up. In a prolonged bear market, the entire market may fall so far that it takes years to recover. Those who retire before the recovery may simply be out of luck. The stock market, in short, is no foolproof source of retirement security...Individual accounts can be part of the answer. But they should be voluntary and a supplement to Social Security, not a replacement for it."
Voted "yes" on strengthening the Social Security Lockbox. (Bill HR 1259 ; vote number 1999-163 on May 26, 1999) Amending the Social Security Lockbox bill to require that any budget surplus cannot be spent until the solvency of Social Security and Medicare is guaranteed.

Illicit Drugs:
Voted "no" on prohibiting needle exchange & medical marijuana in DC. (Bill HR 3064 ; vote number 1999-504 on Oct 14, 1999) Bill would provide .1 million in funds for the District of Columbia and approves the District's .8 billion budget. Among other provisions, the bill prohibits the use of federal funds for needle exchange programs, prohibits implementing an approved ballot initiative to legalize the medicinal use of marijuana.

Ex-felons' Voting Rights:
"As President Bush receives the commission's report, we hope he will finally provide real leadership and support for comprehensive election reform legislation," said Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle and House Minority Leader Richard Gephardt. In the report, states were asked to restore voting rights to convicted felons who have served full sentences. Bush backs the provision, aides said, noting that he signed legislation as governor of Texas moving up voting eligibility for felons.

Gun Policy:
He received "F" from the NRA, and a 100 score from The Coalition to Stop Gun Violence

Abortion Policy:
He received 100 score from Planned Parenthood and a zero from the National Right to Life Committee.

Environmental Policy:
He received a 91 from the League of Conservation Voters.

Minority Issues:
He received an 86% score from the NAACP.

Civil Liberties:
He received 75% score from The American Civil Liberties Union.

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